Laboratory for Speech Physiology
and Motor Control

Ludo Max, Ph.D.
Director



Contact Information

Dept. of Speech & Hearing Sciences
University of Washington
1417 NE 42nd Street
Seattle, WA 98105-6246

(206) 543-2674

If you stutter or if your child stutters, you can make an important and valuable contribution to the scientific understanding of stuttering.

Researchers in the Laboratory for Speech Physiology and Motor Control in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington (Seattle) are conducting several studies that may result in new scientific knowledge about the problems involved in stuttering. Participating in any of these projects provides a wonderful opportunity to make a contribution that may benefit all individuals who stutter.

We are currently recruiting children and adults to participate in our studies in Seattle. All participants receive financial compensation and a free hearing screening. Children also receive free speech and language testing, and parents are provided with a summary report of the results. After completing the study, children also receive a small book or toy.

Children between the ages of 3 and 9, if eligible, will be invited to complete tasks such as speaking into a microphone while wearing earphones, listening to tones while wearing a cap with sensors that record the brain's responses to those tones (see top picture on the right side of this page), or pointing to visual targets with a small movement sensor taped to the finger (middle picture on the right side of this page). Click here to download a brochure that describes the projects in which children can participate.

Adults between the ages of 18 and 50, if eligible, will be invited to complete tasks such as speaking into a microphone while wearing earphones; speaking with small movement sensors attached to the lips, jaw, and tongue (bottom picture on the right side of this page); speaking while wearing a cap with sensors that record brain activity; or pointing to visual targets with a movement sensor attached to the index finger (middle picture on the right side of this page).

If you want more information about any of these studies, or if you want to find out if you or your child are eligible to participate, please click here to access our online contact form. You can also contact Dr. Ludo Max by e-mail () or you can call Dr. Max's staff (phone number 206 543 3161). Thank you in advance for your consideration.

Click here for more detailed information about this research group at the University of Washington.